Have you ever wondered what your raw ACT score was? Or maybe you’ve wanted to compare how you did on one test to another so you can improve your score. Regardless of your reason, an ACT score chart will help you do both. To find out more about the ACT score chart and how it’s helpful to you, keep reading.

Raw Score Vs Scale Score

Before we get into the chart I have for you, let’s talk about how the ACT is scored. In order to do that, we need to learn the difference between the raw score and the scale score.

The raw score is the number of questions you answered correctly in any given section of the ACT. The scale score is what you got on each section of the ACT in terms of the 1-36 scale. Your ACT composite score is the average of the scale score of the four sections. Because the ACT weighs certain questions depending on their difficulty, scaling the raw scores is needed so everything can translate to the 1-36 scale.

What Does the ACT Score Chart Do?

The ACT score chart allows you to see how the raw score converts to the scale score and vice versa. It’s important to note that each official version of the ACT has its own score chart and for the most accurate conversion, you’ll need the ACT score chart that corresponds to your test.

But for simplicity’s sake, you can estimate your raw score by using the ACT score chart below.

Scale Score English Math Reading Science Scale Score
36 75 60 40 40 36
35 72-74 58-59 39 39 35
34 71 57 38 38 34
33 70 55-56 37 37 33
32 68-69 54 35-36 32
31 67 52-53 34 36 31
30 66 50-51 33 35 30
29 65 48-49 32 34 29
28 63-64 45-47 31 33 28
27 62 43-44 30 32 27
26 60-61 40-42 29 30-31 26
25 58-59 38-39 28 28-29 25
24 56-57 36-37 27 26-27 24
23 53-55 34-35 25-26 24-25 23
22 51-52 32-33 24 22-23 22
21 48-50 30-31 22-23 21 21
20 45-47 29 21 19-20 20
19 43-44 27-28 19-20 17-18 19
18 41-42 24-26 18 16 18
17 39-40 21-23 17 14-15 17
16 36-38 17-20 15-16 13 16
15 32-35 13-16 14 12 15
14 29-31 11-12 12-13 11 14
13 27-28 8-10 11 10 13
12 25-26 7 9-10 9 12
11 23-24 5-6 8 8 11
10 20-22 4 6-7 7 10
9 18-19 5-6 9
8 15-17 3 5 8
7 12-14 4 4 7
6 10-11 2 3 3 6
5 8-9 2 5
4 6-7 1 2 4
3 4-5 1 3
2 2-3 1 2
1 0-1 0 0 0 1

How to Use the ACT Score Chart to Your Advantage

The big question is how is this chart useful to you when you’re preparing for the ACT?

By being able to see how your scores for each section convert to raw data, you’ll be able to better determine which sections of the ACT require more focus. It also gives you an idea of which sections you can afford to have wrong answers on and which ones you need to be consistently scoring perfectly. Using the ACT score chart above you can see, for example, that the English section has more leeway than the others if you want a scaled score of 35.

By using this information with your tutor, you can compare your performance across test scores with better accuracy and effectively grade your practice tests in a way that shows you how you would actually score on the ACT. By doing this, you can quantify your scores and even predict what your composite would be on that particular practice test.

Essentially, the ACT score chart helps you study smarter and keep you focused on the sections that really need your attention. It also gives your practice tests more validity, because you’re able to see how your scores would translate in terms of actual ACT scoring.

I always encourage you to learn about the test itself so you’re better able to answer the questions on the test and know how to answer them correctly. The goal with the ACT score chart and with studying for the ACT in general is to improve you score. And by knowing what the test makers are looking for, you can intelligently answer their questions.

I work with tutors every day who share my passion for improving test scores and have taken home some of the top scores in the country. I’ve personally trained them to make sure they can take their test taking tips and educate students like you on how to follow in their footsteps.

Although it’s not as well known as some of the other ways to improve your ACT score, the ACT score chart is an incredibly useful tool. It allows you to compare your scores across multiple versions of the test and score your practice tests so you can see how you would perform in an official capacity. Used with your tutor and private practicing techniques, the ACT score chart is one more helpful tool in your arsenal.

What do you think of the ACT score chart? What are some ways you’ve improved your ACT score? Comment below and let us know!